Choosing an egg donor: What’s the best approach?

Choosing an egg donor is one of the biggest decisions faced by couples undergoing assisted reproduction treatment. In fact, it may be even more difficult than the decision to receive treatment: Choosing whether to use this method of having children is a relatively simple yes/no question; choosing the right egg donor involves almost infinite possibilities, with lifelong consequences for your child.

The first rule to follow when facing this decision is to relax: Tens of thousands of other couples have stood at the same crossroads before you, and have established happy, healthy families using donated eggs. If they can do it, there’s no reason why you can’t.

Secondly, trust the medical professionals you’re working with. If you’re signed up with a reputable, licensed clinic, you should have confidence in their donor selection standards. You should also be getting personalised attention and support with the decision from the clinic staff who are assigned to your case; if you feel that you’re being neglected, or if you have any doubts about their professionalism or standards, you need to discuss those issues with them ASAP, and consider finding a new facility.

Next, think about your priorities. How important is each characteristic you’re looking for in a donor? How do you prioritise physical attractiveness, intellect, talents? And before you start setting priorities, start by looking over a lot of donors to see who is available. You may find a good fit that you wouldn’t have thought of if you had just sat down and made a list. Remember, there’s no magic formula that you have to discover; every couple has different wants and needs.

Remember also that you’ll never be able to guarantee any characteristics, either physical or otherwise. While nobody can put an exact number on it, personality, intellect and physical development all depend on both nature and nurture. Giving your child proper nutrition, medical care, intellectual stimulation and the ability to develop their talents will account for a great deal of who they become as a person. (This also applies when you’re looking at donors: Keep in mind that not everyone has the same opportunities in life, for example in areas such as education.)

Although it can’t be determined 100 per cent, you’ll definitely need to consider how important it is for your children to look like you in terms of eye, hair and skin colour. Because the prevailing medical wisdom is to tell children how they were conceived, it’s not likely that such differences will cause them to be plagued by doubts of their own once they’re grown up.

But when deciding on a donor, you do need to bear in mind that other people (both adults and children) can be nosy, and ask intrusive questions.

For patients who are particularly concerned about this aspect of the decision, ilaya now offers a service allowing you to see adult photos of selected donors. This service requires an additional contract, and of course there are restrictions on downloading pictures and personal data; to take advantage of this option, patients must sign an additional contract with our clinic.

Finally, remember that there is no such thing as a perfect donor. Don’t look at the decision as a burden; don’t think of it in terms of having just one chance to find the perfect option, and everything else will be a failure. Instead, look at it as a world of possibilities where you have the freedom to choose what will be best for you and your family – both present and future.

By | July 3rd, 2017|News, Publications|Comments Off on Choosing an egg donor: What’s the best approach?

Choosing a Ukrainian surrogacy provider

International surrogacy has grown rapidly in Ukraine in recent years, driven by the availability of high-quality programmes and clear laws, in close proximity to Western Europe, and accelerated by the closure of several popular destinations for intended parents. (more…)

By | February 21st, 2017|News, Publications|Comments Off on Choosing a Ukrainian surrogacy provider

How can I look younger without cosmetic surgery?

Skin regeneration and rejuvenation techniques based on cutting-edge cell research techniques are allowing people to halt or even reverse the effects of ageing skin by restoring the cells that keep it young and healthy, providing an alternative to cosmetic surgery or chemical-based treatments such as Botox.

Your skin is made up of three layers: the epidermis, the thin outer layer; the dermis, below that, made up of cells called fibroblasts; and the inner layer, the hypodermis.

Dermal fibroblasts have the role of making new collagen and elastin fibres, the materials that keep your skin healthy and youthful.

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By | October 6th, 2016|News, Publications|Comments Off on How can I look younger without cosmetic surgery?

Is it possible to repair spinal hernia with stem cells?

Medical technologies based on adult stem cells are offering a new treatment method for spinal hernias (also known as slipped discs), one of the most common causes of chronic lower back pain.

Spinal hernias occur most often in the lumbar region, the lower back, though they can happen at any point. The human spine is made up of bones (the vertebrae) and pieces of soft tissue in between them, known as discs. The discs include a tough, fibrous outer layer, and soft tissue inside. In a spinal hernia, the interior bulges and may break through the outer layer. If a herniated disc presses on a nerve, it can cause continuous back pain, possibly severe; numbness in the legs; or sciatica – pain in the sciatic nerve, which runs from the lower back down the back of the legs.

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By | September 13th, 2016|News, Publications|Comments Off on Is it possible to repair spinal hernia with stem cells?

Stem cell treatments offer freedom from prosthetics

Stem cell treatments offer freedom from prosthetics, may someday cure chronic disease

Therapies based on adult stem cells are offering patients today the ability to re-grow broken bones, avoiding prosthetic implants. In coming years, stem-cell-based treatments have the potential to revolutionise the treatment of chronic diseases such as Type-2 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. (more…)

By | July 29th, 2016|News, Publications|Comments Off on Stem cell treatments offer freedom from prosthetics

Scientific Documents June/July 2016

Below you will find some excerpts from scientific journals documenting some of the procedures ilaya has been involved in over the past few months.

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By | July 14th, 2016|Publications|Comments Off on Scientific Documents June/July 2016

Asherman’s Syndrome Treatment

A new treatment method offers an alternative to surgery for some women who suffer from Asherman’s Syndrome, by using stem cells to help the endometrium, the lining of the uterus, to regenerate itself.

The ilaya clinic, based in Kiev, Ukraine, is developing a treatment that uses stem cells from the patient to provide new endometrial cells in areas of uterine scarring. By using the body’s own bio-materials, the Asherman’s Syndrome treatment avoids the risks and potential complications of surgery, and the possible side effects of treatment with drugs. While the clinic has performed several successful procedures, the technology is still in its early stages, and is not suitable for all cases of Asherman’s.

ilaya’s non-surgical procedure uses a camera to scan the inside of the uterus for healthy endometrium tissue. Adult stem cells are taken from those areas, then reproduce in a laboratory for three to four weeks. Once a sufficient number has been produced, they are mixed with a gel that helps them attach to the uterine wall, and applied to the uterus using a catheter.

In suitable cases, the procedure offers an alternative to the standard surgical procedure, which the International Asherman’s Association describes as “a VERY delicate and difficult surgery”, adding that “even surgeons who have experience in other types of uterine surgery may not have the requisite skill or experience level to treat Asherman’s successfully.”

Dimitri Zubov, the head of ilaya’s biotechnology laboratory

The use of stem cells from the patient’s own body reduces the risk of complications, says Dimitri Zubov, the head of ilaya’s biotechnology laboratory, who also serves as a senior research associate at Ukraine’s State Institute of Genetic and Regenerative Medicine.
ilaya’s approach is supported by recent research from the University of Warwick, which in March 2016 found that women who had suffered three or more consecutive miscarriages had a shortage of stem cells in their endometrium.

Depending on the cause of the uterine scarring, some cases of Asherman’s are treated with drugs; however, this can place a heavy burden on the patient’s liver, kidneys and other organs. These side effects are also avoided by ilaya’s stem-cell-based Asherman’s Syndrome treatment.
After the stem-cell treatment is performed, patients are ready for in vitro fertilisation or natural pregnancy; as of March 2016, ilaya’s patients for the new procedure had reported four pregnancies.

ilaya’s treatment of Asherman’s syndrome focuses on minimal invasive methods that are carried out without surgery. The majority of cases receiving a positive result are due to the procedure of applying the patients own stomal cells to the damaged site. This method is also considered to be the safest, as the patient avoids the complications that can occur during invasive surgery and subsequent risk of failure.

In the unlikely event that after treatment, our patient is still unable to conceive, the cost of treatment will be deducted from the cost of our surrogacy program if you wish to use this service.

Stem Cells

What are stem cells?

Unlike most cells in the human body, adult stem cells are unspecialised cells that can renew themselves by cell division. They have the potential to become specialised cells, such as muscle, organ tissue or blood. While much of the research and public debate on stem cells has focused on cells from embryos, stem cells are also present in the adult human body, and divide to replicate the tissue they are found in.

These are the cells that the ilaya clinic uses in its therapies, including treatment for Asherman’s Syndrome, bone regeneration and skin renewal for burn patients. In addition to avoiding the ethical issues surrounding the use of embryonic stem cells, the use of cells from the patient’s own body avoids potential complications of other therapies.

By | May 5th, 2016|Publications|Comments Off on Asherman’s Syndrome Treatment